Banh Mi – One of the world’s best street foods

A little-known secret is that the world’s best sandwich isn’t found in Rome, Copenhagen or even New York City, but o­n the streets of Vietnam, says the Guardian, o­ne of the leading newspapers in the UK.

Banhmi

A story in Guardian’s travel section, written Richard Johnson, makes a list of the best street foods, in which Vietnam’s Banh Mi (Bread) is placed second.

The listing of the best street foods has dishes from around the world, including Daulat ki chaat (India), Phat Kaphrao (Thailand), Burek (Bosnia), Sfenj (Morocco), Walkie-talkies (South Africa), Tamales (Mexico), Red red (Ghana), and Currywurst (Germany).

Here is what Guardian says about the Vietnamese Banh Mi:

What is it? A little-known secret is that the world’s best sandwich isn’t found in Rome, Copenhagen or even New York City, but o­n the streets of Vietnam. It begins with a light baguette grilled over coals. After a smear of mayonnaise and a dollop of pâté, the crispy shell is filled with meat, crunchy pickled vegetables and fresh herbs. It is then typically seasoned with a few drops of soy sauce and a spicy chilli condiment.

Origin: An early example of fusion food, banh mishows an obvious link with the French, rulers of Vietnam in the early 20th Century. Other ingredients, including xa xiu, the barbecued pork better known as char siu, have Chinese origins, while the herbs and seasonings are distinctively Southeast Asian.

Tasting: Banh mi is the epitome of street food, the sandwiches are sold almost exclusively from stalls and vendors. Seating usually takes the form of tiny plastic stools, and the sandwiches are generally served to go, wrapped in recycled paper. Pâté? Meatballs or grilled pork? Chilli? Mayonnaise? Diners choose their meats, toppings and condiments. It’s a collection of the best of Southeast Asian cuisine in a western package.

Finding it in Vietnam: If you’re in the coastal city of Hoi An, head to Phuong o­n Hoang Dieu, a legendary banh mi stall where a sandwich costs VND25,000 (about $1,2).

And in the UK: Anh and Van, two schoolfriends from Hanoi, came up with the name Banhmi11 because, in their mind, the perfect banh mi is 11 bites big. They make everything from scratch, even pickling their own daikon.

Source : Guardian

Share

Advertisement

No comments.

Leave a Reply